Ubuntu 9.04 Netbook Remix 0% Battery Power Situation

zeropercentbattery

Anyone who has ever used a notebook or netbook computer understands that battery charge percentage reporting is not even near an exact science. If your notebooks and netbooks are like the ones I’ve used over the years, you’ve probably found your notebook or netbook completely shuts down way before your battery charge gets to 0%. I’ve had some units that failed with a charge over 20% and power management set not to do anything at that relatively high level. So, imagine my surprise when my Acer Aspire One running Ubuntu 9.04 Netbook Remix kept running about 20 minutes after the battery charge indicator hit 0% (see screenshot above).

I spent quite a bit of time learning about how UNR manages battery power on my Aspire One. And, I’ll be sharing that both here and over on MobileContentToday over the next few days.

Netbook

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eWeek says: Linux to Outsell Windows in Mobile Internet Device Market (But Wait!)

eWeek has an article with the provocative title of…

Linux to Outsell Windows in Mobile Internet Device Market

…that says: Linux will be the top-selling operating system in the mobile Internet device market, outselling Microsoft Windows Mobile and other rivals by 2013, said ABI Research. It goes on to report that In MIDs, all mobile OSes are starting out about equal, “without the baggage of previous histories such as existed in the smart-phone market.”

Do you see the problem with the ABI Research assumptions? It appears to be mixing the netbook/mini-note type Mobile Internet Devices (MID) devices with smartphones. It doesn’t make any sense at all to compare, say, an Asus Eee PC or Nokia N810 (MID devices) with a RIM Blackberry or Nokia N95 or Samsung Blackjack II (smartphones). And, if you did, there is, in fact, a clear mobile OS market leader. It is probably the Symbian S60 with multiple generations of devices from Nokia and Sony-Ericsson that have sold many millions of units. The RIM Blackberry and Windows Mobile can probably be considered significant vertical niche market players in the enterprise space. And, the relative newcomer, the Apple iPhone, certainly has captured a significant mindshare and decent sized market share for a year old device.

I think Linux has made a huge unexpected gain in the mini-notebook space. Previous Linux-based smartphone have not made a dent in the smartphone marketspace. However, this could change if the Google Android based phones take off later this year or early next year. That, however, remains to be seen. And, Apple has a huge headstart on them.

Mobile Devices

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ars technica Shows How To Install Ubuntu on an Eee PC

If you have an Eee PC (I’ve got it in my wish list), ars technica has a how-to article you might be interested in reading…

How to: Installing and running Ubuntu on the Eee PC

Netbook

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Ubuntu Mobile Internet Device (MID) Edition

I watched/read the various articles and blog posts about the recently released…

Ubuntu Mobile Internet Device (MID) Edition

earlier this week. I’ve been working with various Red Hat related distros myself (mostly CentOS and, to a lesser extent, Fedora Core) for most of this decade. But, I’ve downloaded and tried all of the Ubuntu distros when they come out. I have to say that this MID Edition is the one that most interests me the most of any Ubuntu release so far. The irony is that I don’t have any actual MID devices at all (unless you count the OLPC XO). I wonder if Ubuntu is going to provide some kind of ready-to-install ISO file that could be installed in a virtual machine for testing.

Mobile Devices
Netbook

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Fedora 9 Linux Live USB Portable Desktop

Just read this article over on Information Week about Fedora 9‘s (Linux) USB Live feature that lets you store your preferred desktop on a 2GB USB flash drive. This desktop is not from your own Fedora desktop. Instead it is a prepackaged image that Red Hat calls CustomSpins.

Red Hat’s Fedora 9 Loads Portable Desktop On USBs

These desktops can be booted and run directly from the USB flash drive. I haven’t tried it yet. But, it is on my list of things to do :-)

You can find more information about this on Fedora’s web site at…

Fedora Live Images

Addendum: Just found an additional Linux on USB flash drive article on Information Week: How To Run Linux From A USB Flash Drive

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